If you’ve experienced a rotator cuff tear or shoulder injury, you know just how painful and inconvenient any damage to the shoulder joint can be. Your shoulder joint is a real workhorse — and mobility allows you to complete a variety of everyday tasks, from brushing your teeth or hair to driving your car. Repairing the shoulder joint has often required invasive shoulder surgery with a long recovery — but stem cell therapy may provide a safe, minimally invasive alternative.

 

Athletics and Sports: Behind Many Shoulder Injuries

In addition to its role in completing everyday tasks, the shoulder joint is essential to practicing almost all sports — from tennis and golf to basketball and football. Did you know that in 2006 alone, 7.5 million doctor visits were to address shoulder problems — and 4 million of those visits were for rotator cuff injuries? Other shoulder injuries include dislocation, fractures, and contusions. The goal of most patients is a swift recovery with as little downtime as possible — and stem cell therapy can be a means to that end.

 

About Your Rotator Cuff and How You Can Tell if it’s Injured

Let’s take a look at the rotator cuff — a group of muscles and tendons that set the upper arm bone into the shoulder socket, allowing for the greatest range of motion than in any of the body’s joints. How can you tell if your rotator cuff injury? Symptoms include pain, stiffness, weakness, and diminished range of motion to the shoulder.

 

Could Stem Cell Therapy Be a Viable Option for Your Torn Rotator Cuff?

An accurate diagnosis of the injury, often including an MRI, is necessary to assess your most effective treatment plan. The extent of the injury will help determine your best option; complete tears usually require surgical repair. However, partial tears may respond to stem cell injections to the shoulder.

 

Stem Cell Therapy: An Alternative to Surgery?

Under the right conditions, stem cell therapy can provide a minimally-invasive option to address a shoulder injury, chronic wear and tear of the joint cartilage or shoulder joint replacement surgery, resulting in speedier recovery and return to activities, less post-op pain, and a decreased need for physical therapy.